It´s Our Money with Ellen Brown “It’s Our Money with Ellen Brown” provides a unique view behind the curtain of global finance and the monetary system by one of the top experts in the field.

November 2, 2017  

We’ve been told that marketplace productivity is irrefutable evidence of economic efficiency and a precursor to consumer happiness.  But that meme is a self-serving axiom designed to consolidate wealth, power and systems control into the hands of global corporations.  Ellen’s guest Helena Norberg-Hodge is the producer of the award-winning documentary The Economics of Happiness and author of Ancient Futures. She is also founder and director of the NGO Local Futures, which has been a pioneer in the emerging global-to-local movement. Helena shows from her studies with native peoples that economies centered in local production are superior to globalized economies in both efficiency and a happiness quotient for citizens.

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October 23, 2017  

Paying for Catastrophe

Whether a flood, fire, hurricanes or a failed financial system, the Federal Reserve and the US Treasury have the means to address big financial challenges in a variety of ways – if they want to.  Recent devastations challenge our understanding of how to pay for recovery, but when we look back to our not-so-distant past, answers emerge in a clear and encouraging way.  Ellen’s guest is Law Professor Tim Canova, an expert on banking, finance and the Federal Reserve, and candidate for the Congressional seat of Debbie Wasserman Schultz in Florida.  

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September 21, 2017  

Crypto-Chango and Truth in Accounting

 

Ellen Brown reflects on the true nature of money at the Nexus Conference in Aspen, bringing to a renown body of monetary and financial experts the notion that cryptocurrency systems reflect the reality that money is not a fixed inventory of assets but a fluid and fungible source of mutual credit. And co-host Walt McRee discusses the true nature of our public accounting systems with Truth in Accounting Research Director Bill Bergman, who shares what the real numbers of public debt are and how they are often hidden from public view.  Also, a re-visit with Civic-Labs’ Tom Tresser discussing his book “Chicago Is Not Broke – Funding The City We Deserve.”  

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September 21, 2017  

 

Crypto currencies will likely change the future of banking in transformative ways, and there’s even a chance that it could help democratize citizen’s control of their money. Ellen is just completing a book on the subject and discusses how technology is changing the banking landscape. Meanwhile, we welcome noted economist Michael Hudson to the show to disclose in no uncertain terms how the banking cartel traps entire economies into virtually inescapable debt slavery. And co-host Walt McRee provides a retrospective on Wall Street as the worst example of corporate domination.

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August 3, 2017  

What’s your problem? Unfunded pension funds? Massive state debt? Creeping privatization? Codification of criminal banking? Today’s program addresses these chronic problems with a baseline look at why these issues persist despite available solutions. Ellen discusses a state budget shortfall solution that can also solve state pension

shortfalls. Hint: it involves public banks!  Later she talks with noted banking criminologist Bill Black about institutionalized finance industry crime, and cohost Walt McRee talks with Donald Cohen of In The Public Interest about the foundations of privatization that are meant to sweep up public assets to place into private hands. 

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June 15, 2017  

Global monetary expert Bernard Lietaer has said that a country would be more stable financially if it had multiple currencies focused on specific sectors of the economy – the idea being that if one goes down, the others can continue to provide needed financial services. Ellen’s guest is Lionel Denenberg, the tech genius behind PayServices, a crypto-currency concept already authorized to create alternate local and state “money” systems that could serve special needs like the growing cannabis industry. Co-host Walt McRee talks with the former president of the Massachusetts Growth Capital Fund, Charles Grigsby, who is helping public banking advocates bring forward a new infrastructure bank in the MA House based on public banking principles.  And there’s been a big win for public banking in New Jersey!

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May 31, 2017  

Ever notice that regardless of what additional level of public suffering is required, payment of bank debt by governments transcends all.  Debt is the mechanism by which private capital interests retain and control power over public interest and prospects, which is why creating public banks is so important for our cities, counties and states.  This week Ellen talks with a renown and prolific contributor to the public discussion, Stephen Lendman, to take a look at how the new administration fits in with the interests of the global financial regime. And co-host Walt McRee talks with Donald Cohen of In The Public Interest which now reports weekly on the trend of privatizing public assets that enrich private interests.

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May 18, 2017  

As public physical assets deteriorate the world over, profiteers and corporatists are anxiously positioning themselves to profit from their bursting new markets of imminent demand. If you’re a government trying to serve those needs but don’t have a reliable source of affordable funding, like your own public bank, you’re stuck with the scalpers. Bridges aren’t the only failing civic infrastructure – banking is too. Fortunately, public banks can fix them both.

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May 3, 2017  

When three catalytic change agents, Bernie Sanders, Ralph Nader and Michael Hudson, agree that public banking is the way to go, you want to go there!  This week’s “It’s Our Money with Ellen Brown” does just that by looking at why one of America’s most prominent public officials, an anti-corporate national icon and “the world’s best economist” are new passengers on the public banking train heading to “Change, USA.”  All aboard!

 

 

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April 20, 2017  

“Dirty Deals” is the name of a definitive report about Wall Street’s interactions and financing contracts with cities, counties and states nationwide. It’s a gloves-off look at the many ways public entities are forced to acquiesce to abusive usury in their private-bank-capital  borrowing practices for public projects and how we can take effective steps to reverse them. Saqib Bhatti, co-director of Action Center on Race and the Economy (ACRE), discusses why these core financing issues are driving governments around the country to consider public banking and in-house financing mechanisms, and why some of them don’t want to.

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